School Bus Fleet

October 2014

A management & maintenance magazine for school transportation fleets

Issue link: https://sbf.epubxp.com/i/383938

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 9 of 75

8 S C H O O L B U S F L E E T • O C T O B E R 2 0 1 4 National stop-arm survey counts 76K violations BY THOMAS MCMAHON cle passing her school bus as she was crossing the street. In the 2012-13 school year, six chil- dren in the U.S. were fatally struck by vehicles passing their school bus, according to national data compiled by the Kansas State Department of Education. "Any driver who passes a stopped school bus illegally is endangering children and his or her future," Chris- tensen said. "These results highlight the potentially tragic consequences of saving a few seconds by passing a school bus. It can be devastating not only for the victims and their families, but also for the motorist who hits a child and will have to live with the sad consequences." Detailed results from the NASDPTS survey for 2014 and previous years can be found at www.nasdpts.org/ stoparm. Tens of thousands of vehicles con- tinue to illegally pass school buses across the nation each day, according to the results of this year's nation- wide survey of stop-arm running. More than 97,000 school bus driv- ers in 29 states participated in the 2014 edition of the annual survey, which is spearheaded by the National Association of State Directors of Pupil Transportation Services (NASDPTS). A total of 75,966 stop-arm viola- tions were counted in one day. NAS- DPTS offcials said that this sample points to more than 13 million viola- tions in a 180-day school year. "We know that students are far safer in school buses, but when they are outside the bus, they are more vulnerable to injury or death," NAS- DPTS President Max Christensen said. "There are nearly a half million school buses on the road each day in the United States. This survey cap- tured only a fraction of the violations that bus drivers and traffc offcers know all too well are occurring each and every day." Here are some key details on the 2014 survey results: • Of the total 75,966 stop-arm vio- lations counted, 98% were on the left side of the bus (the driver's side), and the other 2% were on the right side. • More vehicles passed buses from the front (58%) than from the rear (42%). • 45% of the violations occurred in the morning, 5% were mid-day and 50% were in the afternoon. This is the fourth year that NAS- DPTS has conducted the national sur- vey. The annual totals have ranged from a high of 88,025 in 2012 to a low of 75,966 violations this year. The number of school bus drivers partic- ipating has varied each year, which may explain the fuctuations in the vi- olation totals. Many states have taken steps to cut down on illegal passing of school buses, including increasing the pen- alties for violations, launching pub- lic awareness and law enforcement campaigns, and allowing the use of exterior cameras on school buses to capture violations. In June, South Carolina enacted a law allowing the use of stop-arm cameras. In March, Wyoming passed a bill that requires all school buses to have stop-arm cameras as of the 2016-17 school year. Up to $5 million will be appropriated to reimburse school dis- tricts for 100% of the costs of the vid- eo surveillance systems. The Wyoming bill was spurred by a 2011 incident in which an 11-year-old girl was struck and killed by a vehi- news alert news alert More vehicles passed school buses from the front (58%) than from the rear (42%). Of the total 75,966 stop-arm violations counted, 98% were on the left side of the school bus (the driver's side). Side of bus Right: 2% Left: 98% Direction of violation From rear: 42% From front: 58% 98 49 0 2 42 21 0 29 58

Articles in this issue

Links on this page

Archives of this issue

view archives of School Bus Fleet - October 2014